User blog: John Nguyen

Anyone in the world

 

 
 
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by John Nguyen - Friday, 12 April 2019, 1:43 AM
Anyone in the world

 

 
 
Anyone in the world

 

 
 
Anyone in the world

 

 
 
Anyone in the world

 

 
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[ Modified: Friday, 12 April 2019, 1:39 AM ]
 
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by John Nguyen - Tuesday, 19 March 2019, 5:03 PM
Anyone in the world

Click HERE to download the letter template to convince your administrators.

TRANSPARENT & AFFORDABLE PRICING

FAQ

Why do you charge teachers for attending the training session when your mission is to empower as many teachers as possible?

Most of the money will be used to cover expensive server costs and business expenses. All prices are negotiable to best fit each school's budget.

What if a teacher cannot attend a scheduled on-site training session?

All subscribed teachers will have 24/7 access to step-by-step How-to videos and pdf guides. Hard copies of pdf guides will also be provided for students to follow along and take notes while watching the tutorial videos. In addition, teachers can join our weekly Video Conference support as well as online community support. Remember our PD model is: "Train First; Pay Later".

What is the best solution for teachers and administrators from schools that are too far to arrange on-site PD Training.?

To streamline the transition, we have step-by-step videos and PDF guides that school administrators and leadership teachers can learn at their own pace. In addition, we will provide schedule live Video-Support until your team is comfortable and ready to implement.  This will save your school money and reduce unnecessary costs. Remember our PD model is: "Train First; Pay Later".

How do I pay with a school Purchase Order?

If you would like to pay using a school purchase order,  then please fill out this form.

After you have completed the form, 

(1) we will use the information to generate an invoice and email it to you. This invoice will allow the person who handles purchasing at your school to create a Purchase Order.

(2) Once we have received the PO, we will schedule the best time for the training session and create all the courses on StreamlineED.com for all participating teachers.

If have any questions, please contact us at info@streamlineED.com to speak to one of us.

Thank You,

John Nguyen, CEO  -- "Empower Teachers to Empower Students"

Win Elements LLC   --"All-in-One PD provided by current teachers"

PO Box 7240

Moreno Valley, CA 92552

StreamlineED.com , i.streamlineEd.com  , StreamlineED.net

Chemistry/AP Chemistry

Science Co-Chair

Linkedin Facebook @StreamlineED  #innovateequity #SelfReflective




[ Modified: Sunday, 15 September 2019, 1:07 PM ]
 
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by John Nguyen - Friday, 1 March 2019, 12:30 AM
Anyone in the world

Our students come from a diverse background, and many students often do not have stable homes. Many live in foster homes or families of low socio-economic status. Some of these students are often either unnoticed or act-out in classes. As teachers, we believe that these students need individualized support based on their diverse needs. However, and unfortunately, there is a small percentage of students who need appropriate intervention to refocus them to be on task. As teachers, there are two critical challenges that we need to acknowledge before we can provide proper support. The first challenge is to identify struggling students. Often, these students are quiet. With the constant distraction from cellphone and social media, these students quietly opt out the learning opportunities. They would secretly use their cellphones instead of engaging in the lessons. Even if these students do not have cell phones, they would be physically in the classes, but mentally, they are not there. In a class of thirty-six students, it is challenging to identify those students. However, the power of technology used in Self-Reflective Direction Instruction allows teachers to gain and evaluate the students’ learning in real-time.


Once we have identified those students, we can now investigate why the students are struggling. Is it their disadvantaged backgrounds? Is it their lack of effort? Is it their learning disability? Through traditional direct instruction, it is almost impossible to answer these questions if the teachers assess students once a week, which is too late to provide any intervention for those students.  Through Self-Reflective Direction Instruction, we can evaluate data to answer each one of the questions above with concrete and measurable data.


However, comprehensive online data can only tell half of the story about students’ learning. We also need to look at students’ tangible work—that is, students' notebooks.  The students’ notebooks are not only essential to evaluate students learning progress, but they are critical components of students’ learning process. As teachers, we need to establish a specific, yet simple and meaningful, guideline to help students organize their work, notes, and other tangible activities in the class. More importantly,  the notebooks are more than just a collection of students’ work, but it would become daily tools that allow students to access and review their prior knowledge to make new connections and make new knowledge. Therefore, as teachers, we need to prioritize the purpose of students’ notebook.  In our chemistry classes, we have developed a notebook’s guideline that is simple and adaptable for any subject, with the primary focus of helping students to their prior knowledge to use it later to develop new understanding.

 


 
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by John Nguyen - Friday, 1 March 2019, 12:18 AM
Anyone in the world

Self-Reflective Learning: Not all Face-to-Face Interactions Are the Same.


Most of the interaction in traditional brick-and-mortar classes are teacher-centered. The teachers present the same content to all students in the classes, and there is little differentiation to meet students’ diverse needs. The interaction is between one teacher and their 36 students. Often, this format of interaction widens the gap in achievement among students because most of the students who participate are the students who already excel in the class. The students who really need our support are often unnoticed by teachers. When it’s time to evaluate students’ grade at the end of each quarter, it is too late to provide appropriate intervention. However, using technology in blended learning allows the teachers to provide meaningful and individualized interaction between the teachers and their students. Teachers can quickly access the data to identify struggling students to provide appropriate intervention. The data from the technology allow teachers and the students to work together to discuss the students’ strengths and weaknesses, and the teachers can discuss with the students about possible options to help students to be successful in the class.

Self-Reflective Learning: Redefine Students’ Intervention

Our students come from a diverse background, and many students often do not have stable homes. Many live in foster homes or in families of low socio-economic status. Some of these students are often either unnoticed or act-out in classes. As teachers, we believe that these students need individualized support based on their diverse needs. However, and unfortunately, there is a small percentage of students who need appropriate intervention to refocus them to be on task. As teachers, there are two critical challenges that we need to acknowledge before we can provide proper support and intervention. The first challenge is to identify struggling students. Often, these students are quiet. With the constant distraction from cellphone and social media, these students quietly opt out the learning opportunities. The would secretly use their cellphones instead of engaging in the lessons. Even if these students do not have cell phones, they would be physically in the classes, but mentally, they are not there. In a class of thirty-six students, it is challenging to identify those students. However, the power of technology used in Self-Reflective Direction Instruction allows teachers to gain and evaluate the students’ learning in real-time.

Once we have identified those students, we can now investigate why the students are struggling. Is it their disadvantaged backgrounds? Is it their lack of effort? Is it their learning disability? Through traditional direct instruction, it is almost impossible to answer these questions if the teachers assess students once a week, which is too late to provide any intervention for those students.  Through Self-Reflective Direction Instruction and technology, we can evaluate data to answer each one of the questions above with concrete and measurable data.

Lastly, if you have been benefitted from our Teaching Strategies, please share your stories below to inspire other teachers to provide learning equity for all students. 

 


[ Modified: Friday, 1 March 2019, 12:27 AM ]
 
Anyone in the world

How it is different than Blended Learning?

Blended learning was meant to be a revolutionary pedagogy shift in this era of education dues to its application of technology. However, third-party private companies have tainted blended learning with their thirst to privatize education by dehumanizing our public education system and the teaching profession. They portray public education as a failing and antiquated system. On the surface, it seems obvious if we look at the current CAASSP scores. Private companies, profit or non-profit, and charter schools use those data to degrade our public education system while presenting themselves as the silver linings.

Although there are some flaws in our public education system, our many years of teaching experiences in the classroom prove that public schools are the safest and most nurturing places for our students. To understand this, one has to experiences the challenges of teaching 165 diverse students who came to school with various different backgrounds–mostly from disadvantaged and low-socioeconomic status.  Through our many years of teaching, we had many students who don’t have basic needs like food or clothing, live in foster homes, grandparents, aunts, or uncles. Some of our students’ parents were incarcerated, and some of the students were incarcerated or in gangs.  Also, some of our students have learning disabilities. When we called homes, more than half of the numbers did not work. Would a private charter school accept any of the students above? Most consider-to-be successful charter schools, public or private, have difficult entrance exams and strict policies that prevent these type of students from accepting into their schools. They also require the parent’s involvement.

Consequently, the students who are going to charters are the best students with the most supportive parents. If students do not meet the charter school’s requirements, they would be expelled from the charter school. Where would these students go?  Each year, we have students transferred from charter schools or other public schools at halfway into the semester because they were expelled from those schools. As a parent, how would you feel if you are randomly assigned to raise random children, even one of those children has a history of defiance and violence?

However, this is our most rewarding aspect of being a teacher. Each student is an opportunity for us to make a difference. Teaching is not all about helping our student to master a content; instead, it is the teacher-student professional relationship that transforms the lives of our students. Before we can apply for the teaching program, we have to prove our content competency by passing multiple tests. The entire teaching program is dedicated to train future teachers with the research and learn theories that prepare us to serve the diverse needs of today’s students. We read thousands of pages of educational research and theories, and we apply them during our student teaching. We explore and learn current education technology to differentiate our instruction to support the varying needs of today’s students. In our classes, we continue to redefine our understanding of those research and theories through our daily experiences and interaction with our students. Also, we continue to train and self-teach ourselves with the latest research and teaching pedagogies through professional development because know our students are always changing. For each new school year, we have a new set of students with a different set of needs.

As teachers, the greatest challenges are to create opportunities for students to learn content while learning the essential social and lifelong skills that would prepare for any future challenges. The value of this mission is self-evident when one teaches and interacts with many students for many years. But, for most parents and political leaders, it is almost incomprehensible, and all they see are their children test scores or grades in the class. They would never have the opportunity to witness the transformation and development of their children’s growth mindsets, intellects, and skills over the course of one year.

Therefore, working with other teachers, we are inspired to form Win Elements LLC, with the mission to empower teachers to empower students by creating transparency in the classes while creating equity for all students. Through this company, we create and host online learning management websites for K-12 teachers and students. Also, we also create a Professional Development Training service to train new and veteran teachers to use specific technology and teaching strategies to meet the individual needs of each teacher so they can use the tools to empower their students. Our Professional Development is based on our experiences and many other teachers’ experiences in the classroom, which allow us to interpret and apply the current educational research and theories from K-12 public teachers’ point of views.  Some the important research include John Hattie’s’ Visible Learning, AVID strategies, Piaget’s cognitive development, Zones of Proximal Development, Costa’s DOK, Positive and Negative Reinforcement, and many other child development theories.

To illustrate how people with different backgrounds would interpret educational research differently, we can look at John Hattie’s work. John Hattie is a professor at a college, and his work encompasses “1400 meta-analyses” that studies over “300 million students”. For those who have not been teaching the “regular” or “low-level” classes, they would use the list of influences in a pick-and-remove manner. They try to use Hattie’s work to look an easy solution–make all teachers teach the same strategies that have the highest impacts. As a teacher, we quickly learn that such solutions do not exist because of the diverse needs of our students. As teachers, we learn that it does not matter what call the strategies, as long as they fundamentally affect student’s learning. Before we can do that, we have to define what is learning. To us many teachers, learning is the process of building new knowledge from our prior knowledge–academically, socially, cognitively, physically, and/or psychologically– through living new experiences that force one to self-reflect on our current self. Hence, the name of our model of learning is Self-Reflective Learning, which includes Self-Reflective Direct Instruction, Self-Reflective Interactive Practice, Self-Reflective Notebook, Self-Reflective Collaboration, Self-Reflective Teaching/PLanning, and Self-Reflective Leadership. It is about reflecting on one’s current self to learn.

 

 


[ Modified: Friday, 1 March 2019, 12:13 AM ]